eHow Memoir Writing Tips, Part 4

eHow Memoir Writing Tips, Part 4
This is the last post in our series on eHow.com’s “mini autobiography” suggestions.
7. Conclude by writing about how you see the world and what you have learned from life and those in your world so far. Discuss your goals, dreams and hopes for yourself and your family.
WriteMyMemoirs commentary: While this is a valuable suggestion, I wouldn’t call it a “must do.” Not everyone wants to use a memoir to philosophize. If you’ve fully told your story as you went along, including your feelings and point of view, you may not feel it’s necessary to cull your impressions into a chapter on “what you have learned from life.” As to this tip’s second suggestion, I think it can be risky. For example, if you put into writing your hopes and dreams for your grandchildren, you could regret it later if your goals for them turn out to be out of touch with their goals for themselves. It’s not that I believe that tip #7 is inappropriate—not at all. It could make an interesting concluding chapter. I just don’t think you should feel that your work is not complete work if you choose to forego this idea.
8. Include photos and captions in your mini autobiography. Start with your childhood and include photos of your friends and family members as well.
WriteMyMemoirs commentary: This is good advice. Visuals always serve a purpose in a memoir. Anyone reading your life story will be interested to see what you and the people in your life looked like when all of you were younger. I would just caution you that, if you publish your work, even online, make sure to get permission of living people to show their image.
And that ends our look at these 8 tips. It’s been fun!

This is the last post in our series on eHow.com’s “mini autobiography” suggestions.

7. Conclude by writing about how you see the world and what you have learned from life and those in your world so far. Discuss your goals, dreams and hopes for yourself and your family.

WriteMyMemoirs commentary: While this is a valuable suggestion, I wouldn’t call it a “must do.” Not everyone wants to use a memoir to philosophize. If you’ve fully told your story as you went along, including your feelings and point of view, you may not feel it’s necessary to cull your impressions into a chapter on “what I have learned from life.” As to this tip’s second suggestion, I think it can be risky. For example, if you put into writing your hopes and dreams for your grandchildren, you could regret it later if your goals for them turn out to be out of touch with their goals for themselves. It’s not that I believe that tip #7 is inappropriate—not at all. It could make an interesting concluding chapter. I just don’t think you should feel that your work is not complete work if you choose to forego this idea.

8. Include photos and captions in your mini autobiography. Start with your childhood and include photos of your friends and family members as well.

WriteMyMemoirs commentary: This is good advice. Visuals always serve a purpose in a memoir. Anyone reading your life story will be interested to see what you and the people in your life looked like when all of you were younger. I would just caution you that, if you publish your work, even online, make sure to get permission of living people to show their image.

And that ends our look at these 8 tips. Now go back to writing your memoir!