Memoir Teacher for Hire

Memoir Teacher for Hire
If you can get a group together and want to hold a memoir workshop, there’s a teacher who will come to you. His name is Thomas Larson; go to thomaslarson.com for details about him. Write My Memoirs has nothing to do with Thomas or his workshops. We neither vouch for him nor receive any type of commission from him. However, he’s a member of the faculty at Ashland University in Ohio and the author of The Memoir and the Memoirist: Reading and Writing Personal Narrative; he seems like the real deal to me. Perhaps you can ask your local library or high school to contact him at tom.larson@sbcglobal.net for pricing information.
He begins his workshop by exploring the differences between traditional autobiography and contemporary memoir. Then he gets to the nitty-gritty of helping participants figure out how to begin, where to focus, which episodes of your life will make interesting topics, how to “discover the emotional truth” of your story and the various literary elements that come into play. By the end of the workshop, you should have a draft of a chapter or section of your story.
“Many of us have lived fascinating lives whether inwardly or outwardly, during childhood long ago or as adults in the last decade,” Thomas writes on his website. He sums up the definition of a modern memoir as “a story that focuses on the meaning and intensity of a singular relationship in the author’s life—unresolved feelings for a parent, a child, a sibling, a friend; coming to terms with a loss, an illness, a death; remembering a significant phase like childhood or adolescence or a period like college in which the writer was challenged or changed.”

If you can get a group together and want to hold a memoir workshop, there’s a teacher who will come to you. His name is Thomas Larson; go to thomaslarson.com for details about him. Write My Memoirs has nothing to do with Thomas or his workshops. We neither vouch for him nor receive any type of commission from him. However, he’s a member of the faculty at Ashland University in Ohio and the author of The Memoir and the Memoirist: Reading and Writing Personal Narrative; he seems like the real deal to me. Perhaps you can ask your local library or high school to contact him at tom.larson@sbcglobal.net for pricing information.

He begins his workshop by exploring the differences between traditional autobiography and contemporary memoir. Then he gets to the nitty-gritty of helping participants figure out how to begin, where to focus, which episodes of your life will make interesting topics, how to “discover the emotional truth” of your story and the various literary elements that come into play. By the end of the workshop, you should have a draft of a chapter or section of your story.

“Many of us have lived fascinating lives whether inwardly or outwardly, during childhood long ago or as adults in the last decade,” Thomas writes on his website. He sums up the definition of a modern memoir as “a story that focuses on the meaning and intensity of a singular relationship in the author’s life—unresolved feelings for a parent, a child, a sibling, a friend; coming to terms with a loss, an illness, a death; remembering a significant phase like childhood or adolescence or a period like college in which the writer was challenged or changed.”