Every ordinary life story is extraordinary!

Every ordinary life story is extraordinary!

"One Book" Concept Sweeps the Country’s Libraries

Communities enjoy reading one book together each year.
“One Book??? Concept Sweeps the Country’s Libraries
If you’re writing your memoir, you probably enjoy reading. Many communities have encouraged their residents’ love of reading with a simple initiative, “One Book.??? The idea is for everyone in the community to read a selected book and then gather to discuss it, perhaps inviting the author to town to participate and scheduling ancillary events. Typically, the library assumes the focus and administration of the activities.
Detroit book enthusiasts are spending the year exploring The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. In Richardson, TX, they’re reading Jamie Ford’s best-selling first novel, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet. Chicago, which selects a book twice each year, chose Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman for spring 2011, while just north in Wilmette, IL, this year’s single selection is Let the Great World Spin by Colum McCann. For its fourth annual “One Book??? event, the North Plains, OR, Public Library opted to commemorate the city’s centennial by selecting Ivan Doig’s The Whistling Season, set in 1911. In Louden County, VA, Bicycles: Love Poems by Nikki Giovanni supports the library’s year-long theme, “Try Poetry.???
If you would like to launch a “one book??? program in your community, start with the American Libraries Association’s page of resources, where you’ll find this link to a guide that covers everything from budgeting to marketing to book selection. For children, growing up in a community that values reading is a nice advantage. For adults, it can become a social connection to meet literary-minded neighbors.

If you’re writing your memoir, you probably enjoy reading. Many communities encourage their residents’ love of reading through a simple initiative, “One Book.” The idea is for everyone in the community to read a selected book and then gather to discuss it, perhaps inviting the author to town to participate and scheduling ancillary events. Typically, the library assumes the focus and administration of the activities.

Detroit book enthusiasts are spending the year exploring The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. In Richardson, TX, they’re reading Jamie Ford’s best-selling first novel, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet. Chicago, which selects a book twice each year, chose Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman for spring 2011, while just north in Wilmette, IL, this year’s single selection is Let the Great World Spin by Colum McCann. For its fourth annual “One Book??? event, the North Plains, OR, Public Library opted to commemorate the city’s centennial by selecting Ivan Doig’s The Whistling Season, set in 1911. In Louden County, VA, Bicycles: Love Poems by Nikki Giovanni supports the library’s year-long theme, “Try Poetry.”

If you would like to launch a “one book” program in your community, start with the American Libraries Association’s page of resources, where you’ll find this link to a guide that covers everything from budgeting to marketing to book selection. For children, growing up in a community that values reading is a nice advantage. For adults, it can become a social connection to meet literary-minded neighbors.

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Then just set up a chapter and start writing your memoir. Don’t worry about rules. There are no rules to writing your memoir; there are only trends. These trends are based on techniques and features identified in current top-selling memoirs. At best, they’re the flavor of the month. If you’re capturing your life in print for your family, for your own gratification or to inspire readers, rather than aiming to set off Hollywood screenplay bidding wars, these trends don’t even apply to you. You’ll write the memoir that suits you best, and it will be timeless, not trend-driven.There are no rules, but there are four steps:

1. Theme/framework
2. Writing
3. Editing/polishing
4. Self-publishing

You’ve researched this, too, and you’ve been shocked at the price for getting help with any one of those steps, much less all four. That’s because most memoir sites promise to commercialize your work. They’ll follow a formula based on current memoir trends, because they want to convince you that they can turn your memoir into a best-seller. These sites overwhelm you with unnecessary information not to help you, the memoir author, but to address Search Engine Optimization (SEO) algorithms so they can sell more.

That’s not what we do at Write My Memoirs. Our small community of coaches, writers and editors are every bit as skilled as any you’ll find, and we charge appropriately for their expertise and the time they’ll spend helping you craft a compelling, enjoyable read. But you won’t pay an upcharge for other websites’ commercialization, the marketing that follows, and the pages of intimidating “advice.” You can sell your book if you like—we have ISBNs available for you—but our organic process of capturing your story takes a noncommercial path.

If you want help with any or all of the four steps above, choose from our services or save money by selecting one of our packages. If you’d like to talk about what’s right for you, schedule a call. One year from now, you can be holding your published memoir in your hand. And at that point, it will be a big deal!